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Rotation- and temperature-dependence of stellar latitudinal differential rotation
More than 600 high resolution spectra of stars with spectral type F andlater were obtained in order to search for signatures of differentialrotation in line profiles. In 147 stars the rotation law could bemeasured, with 28 of them found to be differentially rotating.Comparison to rotation laws in stars of spectral type A reveals thatdifferential rotation sets in at the convection boundary in theHR-diagram; no star that is significantly hotter than the convectionboundary exhibits the signatures of differential rotation. Four lateA-/early F-type stars close to the convection boundary and at v sin{i}≈ 100 km s-1 show extraordinarily strong absolute shear atshort rotation periods around one day. It is suggested that this is dueto their small convection zone depth and that it is connected to anarrow range in surface velocity; the four stars are very similar inTeff and v sin{i}. Detection frequencies of differentialrotation α = ΔΩ/Ω > 0 were analyzed in starswith varying temperature and rotation velocity. Measurable differentialrotation is more frequent in late-type stars and slow rotators. Thestrength of absolute shear, ΔΩ, and differential rotationα are examined as functions of the stellar effective temperatureand rotation period. The highest values of ΔΩ are found atrotation periods between two and three days. In slower rotators, thestrongest absolute shear at a given rotation rateΔΩmax is given approximately byΔΩmax ∝ P-1, i.e.,αmax ≈ const. In faster rotators, bothαmax and ΔΩmax diminish lessrapidly. A comparison with differential rotation measurements in starsof later spectral type shows that F-stars exhibit stronger shear thancooler stars do and the upper boundary in absolute shear ΔΩwith temperature is consistent with the temperature-scaling law found inDoppler Imaging measurements.

Single-Visit Photometric and Obscurational Completeness
We report a method that uses ``completeness'' to estimate the number ofextrasolar planets discovered by an observing program with adirect-imaging instrument. We develop a completeness function forEarth-like planets on ``habitable'' orbits for an instrument with acentral field obscuration, uniform sensitivity in an annular detectionzone, and limiting sensitivity that is expressed as a ``deltamagnitude'' with respect to the star, determined by systematic effects(given adequate exposure time). We demonstrate our method of estimationby applying it to our understanding of the coronagraphic version of theTerrestrial Planet Finder (TPF-C) mission as of 2004 October. Weestablish an initial relationship between the size, quality, andstability of the instrument's optics and its ability to meet missionscience requirements. We provide options for increasing the fidelity andversatility of the models on which our method is based, and we discusshow the method could be extended to model the TPF-C mission as a wholeto verify that its design can meet the science requirements.

The Geneva-Copenhagen survey of the Solar neighbourhood. Ages, metallicities, and kinematic properties of ˜14 000 F and G dwarfs
We present and discuss new determinations of metallicity, rotation, age,kinematics, and Galactic orbits for a complete, magnitude-limited, andkinematically unbiased sample of 16 682 nearby F and G dwarf stars. Our˜63 000 new, accurate radial-velocity observations for nearly 13 500stars allow identification of most of the binary stars in the sampleand, together with published uvbyβ photometry, Hipparcosparallaxes, Tycho-2 proper motions, and a few earlier radial velocities,complete the kinematic information for 14 139 stars. These high-qualityvelocity data are supplemented by effective temperatures andmetallicities newly derived from recent and/or revised calibrations. Theremaining stars either lack Hipparcos data or have fast rotation. Amajor effort has been devoted to the determination of new isochrone agesfor all stars for which this is possible. Particular attention has beengiven to a realistic treatment of statistical biases and errorestimates, as standard techniques tend to underestimate these effectsand introduce spurious features in the age distributions. Our ages agreewell with those by Edvardsson et al. (\cite{edv93}), despite severalastrophysical and computational improvements since then. We demonstrate,however, how strong observational and theoretical biases cause thedistribution of the observed ages to be very different from that of thetrue age distribution of the sample. Among the many basic relations ofthe Galactic disk that can be reinvestigated from the data presentedhere, we revisit the metallicity distribution of the G dwarfs and theage-metallicity, age-velocity, and metallicity-velocity relations of theSolar neighbourhood. Our first results confirm the lack of metal-poor Gdwarfs relative to closed-box model predictions (the ``G dwarfproblem''), the existence of radial metallicity gradients in the disk,the small change in mean metallicity of the thin disk since itsformation and the substantial scatter in metallicity at all ages, andthe continuing kinematic heating of the thin disk with an efficiencyconsistent with that expected for a combination of spiral arms and giantmolecular clouds. Distinct features in the distribution of the Vcomponent of the space motion are extended in age and metallicity,corresponding to the effects of stochastic spiral waves rather thanclassical moving groups, and may complicate the identification ofthick-disk stars from kinematic criteria. More advanced analyses of thisrich material will require careful simulations of the selection criteriafor the sample and the distribution of observational errors.Based on observations made with the Danish 1.5-m telescope at ESO, LaSilla, Chile, and with the Swiss 1-m telescope at Observatoire deHaute-Provence, France.Complete Tables 1 and 2 are only available in electronic form at the CDSvia anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/418/989

Improved Astrometry and Photometry for the Luyten Catalog. II. Faint Stars and the Revised Catalog
We complete construction of a catalog containing improved astrometry andnew optical/infrared photometry for the vast majority of NLTT starslying in the overlap of regions covered by POSS I and by the secondincremental Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) release, approximately 44%of the sky. The epoch 2000 positions are typically accurate to 130 mas,the proper motions to 5.5 mas yr-1, and the V-J colors to0.25 mag. Relative proper motions of binary components are measured to 3mas yr-1. The false-identification rate is ~1% for11<~V<~18 and substantially less at brighter magnitudes. Theseimprovements permit the construction of a reduced proper-motion diagramthat, for the first time, allows one to classify NLTT stars intomain-sequence (MS) stars, subdwarfs (SDs), and white dwarfs (WDs). We inturn use this diagram to analyze the properties of both our catalog andthe NLTT catalog on which it is based. In sharp contrast to popularbelief, we find that NLTT incompleteness in the plane is almostcompletely concentrated in MS stars, and that SDs and WDs are detectedalmost uniformly over the sky δ>-33deg. Our catalogwill therefore provide a powerful tool to probe these populationsstatistically, as well as to reliably identify individual SDs and WDs.

Differential rotation in rapidly rotating F-stars
We obtained high quality spectra of 135 stars of spectral types F andlater and derived ``overall'' broadening functions in selectedwavelength regions utilizing a Least Squares Deconvolution (LSD)procedure. Precision values of the projected rotational velocity v \siniwere derived from the first zero of the Fourier transformed profiles andthe shapes of the profiles were analyzed for effects of differentialrotation. The broadening profiles of 70 stars rotating faster than v\sini = 45 km s-1 show no indications of multiplicity nor ofspottedness. In those profiles we used the ratio of the first two zerosof the Fourier transform q_2/q_1 to search for deviations from rigidrotation. In the vast majority the profiles were found to be consistentwith rigid rotation. Five stars were found to have flat profilesprobably due to cool polar caps, in three stars cuspy profiles werefound. Two out of those three cases may be due to extremely rapidrotation seen pole on, only in one case (v \sini = 52 km s-1)is solar-like differential rotation the most plausible explanation forthe observed profile. These results indicate that the strength ofdifferential rotation diminishes in stars rotating as rapidly as v \sini>~ 50 km s-1.Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp tocdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.125.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/412/813Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, LaSilla, 69.D-0015(B).

HIPPARCOS age-metallicity relation of the solar neighbourhood disc stars
We derive age-metallicity relations (AMRs) and orbital parameters forthe 1658 solar neighbourhood stars to which accurate distances aremeasured by the HIPPARCOS satellite. The sample stars comprise 1382 thindisc stars, 229 thick disc stars, and 47 halo stars according to theirorbital parameters. We find a considerable scatter for thin disc AMRalong the one-zone Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) model. Orbits andmetallicities of thin disc stars show now clear relation each other. Thescatter along the AMR exists even if the stars with the same orbits areselected. We examine simple extension of one-zone GCE models whichaccount for inhomogeneity in the effective yield and inhomogeneous starformation rate in the Galaxy. Both extensions of the one-zone GCE modelcannot account for the scatter in age - [Fe/H] - [Ca/Fe] relationsimultaneously. We conclude, therefore, that the scatter along the thindisc AMR is an essential feature in the formation and evolution of theGalaxy. The AMR for thick disc stars shows that the star formationterminated 8 Gyr ago in the thick disc. As already reported by Grattonet al. (\cite{Gratton_et.al.2000}) and Prochaska et al.(\cite{Prochaska_et.al.2000}), thick disc stars are more Ca-rich thanthin disc stars with the same [Fe/H]. We find that thick disc stars showa vertical abundance gradient. These three facts, the AMR, verticalgradient, and [Ca/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation, support monolithic collapseand/or accretion of satellite dwarf galaxies as likely thick discformation scenarios. Tables 2 and 3 are only available in electronicform at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5)or via http:/ /cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/ cgi-bin/qcat?J/ A+A/394/927

Late-type members of young stellar kinematic groups - I. Single stars
This is the first paper of a series aimed at studying the properties oflate-type members of young stellar kinematic groups. We concentrate ourstudy on classical young moving groups such as the Local Association(Pleiades moving group, 20-150Myr), IC 2391 supercluster (35Myr), UrsaMajor group (Sirius supercluster, 300Myr), and Hyades supercluster(600Myr), as well as on recently identified groups such as the Castormoving group (200Myr). In this paper we compile a preliminary list ofsingle late-type possible members of some of these young stellarkinematic groups. Stars are selected from previously established membersof stellar kinematic groups based on photometric and kinematicproperties as well as from candidates based on other criteria such astheir level of chromospheric activity, rotation rate and lithiumabundance. Precise measurements of proper motions and parallaxes takenfrom the Hipparcos Catalogue, as well as from the Tycho-2 Catalogue, andpublished radial velocity measurements are used to calculate theGalactic space motions (U, V, W) and to apply Eggen's kinematic criteriain order to determine the membership of the selected stars to thedifferent groups. Additional criteria using age-dating methods forlate-type stars will be applied in forthcoming papers of this series. Afurther study of the list of stars compiled here could lead to a betterunderstanding of the chromospheric activity and their age evolution, aswell as of the star formation history in the solar neighbourhood. Inaddition, these stars are also potential search targets for directimaging detection of substellar companions.

A revision of the solar neighbourhood metallicity distribution
We present a revised metallicity distribution of dwarfs in the solarneighbourhood. This distribution is centred on solar metallicity. Weshow that previous metallicity distributions, selected on the basis ofspectral type, are biased against stars with solar metallicity orhigher. A selection of G-dwarf stars is inherently biased againstmetal-rich stars and is not representative of the solar neighbourhoodmetallicity distribution. Using a sample selected on colour, we obtain adistribution where approximately half the stars in the solarneighbourhood have metallicities higher than [Fe/H]=0. The percentage ofmid-metal-poor stars ([Fe/H]<-0.5) is approximately 4 per cent, inagreement with present estimates of the thick disc. In order to have ametallicity distribution comparable to chemical evolution modelpredictions, we convert the star fraction to mass fraction, and showthat another bias against metal-rich stars affects dwarf metallicitydistributions, due to the colour (or spectral type) limits of thesamples. Reconsidering the corrections resulting from the increasingthickness of the stellar disc with age, we show that the simpleclosed-box model with no instantaneous recycling approximation gives areasonable fit to the observed distribution. Comparisons with theage-metallicity relation and abundance ratios suggest that the simpleclosed-box model may be a viable model of the chemical evolution of theGalaxy at solar radius.

Catalogue of Apparent Diameters and Absolute Radii of Stars (CADARS) - Third edition - Comments and statistics
The Catalogue, available at the Centre de Données Stellaires deStrasbourg, consists of 13 573 records concerning the results obtainedfrom different methods for 7778 stars, reported in the literature. Thefollowing data are listed for each star: identifications, apparentmagnitude, spectral type, apparent diameter in arcsec, absolute radiusin solar units, method of determination, reference, remarks. Commentsand statistics obtained from CADARS are given. The Catalogue isavailable in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp tocdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcar?J/A+A/367/521

The ROSAT all-sky survey catalogue of the nearby stars
We present X-ray data for all entries of the Third Catalogue of NearbyStars \cite[(Gliese & Jahreiss 1991)]{gli91} that have been detectedas X-ray sources in the ROSAT all-sky survey. The catalogue contains1252 entries yielding an average detection rate of 32.9 percent. Inaddition to count rates, source detection parameters, hardness ratios,and X-ray fluxes we also list X-ray luminosities derived from Hipparcosparallaxes. Catalogue also available at CDS via anonymous ftp tocdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

The ROSAT all-sky survey catalogue of optically bright main-sequence stars and subgiant stars
We present X-ray data for all main-sequence and subgiant stars ofspectral types A, F, G, and K and luminosity classes IV and V listed inthe Bright Star Catalogue that have been detected as X-ray sources inthe ROSAT all-sky survey; several stars without luminosity class arealso included. The catalogue contains 980 entries yielding an averagedetection rate of 32 percent. In addition to count rates, sourcedetection parameters, hardness ratios, and X-ray fluxes we also listX-ray luminosities derived from Hipparcos parallaxes. The catalogue isalso available in electronic form via anonymous ftp tocdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

X-ray/optical observations of stars with shallow convection zones (A8-G2 V)
We present Walraven photometry and ROSAT All-Sky Survey data for asample of 173 bright main-sequence stars with spectral types between A8Vand G2V\@. These observations are part of a study of the onset ofmagnetic surface activity along the main sequence. Values for theeffective temperature, surface gravity and interstellar reddening havebeen obtained from a comparison of the observed Walraven colours withtheoretical values. These parameters have been used to derive accurateX-ray\ surface flux densities.

An Optical Atlas of Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) Sources
The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) has been detecting EUV sourcessince its launch in June 1992. Positions of 540 sources have been madeavailable to the community by the EUVE team. We have extracted 7' X 7'images centered on these 540 EUVE sources from the Space TelescopeScience Institute digitized sky archives. We present these images asmosaic finder charts to aid observers trying to identify EUVE sources,or to characterize known sources. (SECTION: Atlases)

An All-Sky Catalog of Faint Extreme Ultraviolet Sources
We present a list of 534 objects detected jointly in the ExtremeUltraviolet Explorer (EUVE) 100 Angstroms all-sky survey and in theROSAT X-Ray Telescope 0.25 keV band. The joint selection criterionpermits use of a low count rate threshold in each survey. This lowthreshold is roughly 60% of the threshold used in the previous EUVEall-sky surveys, and 166 of the objects listed here are new EUV sources,appearing in neither the Second EUVE Source Catalog nor the ROSAT WideField Camera Second Catalog. The spatial distribution of this all-skycatalog shows three features: an enhanced concentration of objects inUrsa Major, where the Galactic integrated H I column reaches its globalminimum; an enhanced concentration in the third quadrant of the Galaxy(lII from 180 deg to 270 deg) including the Canis Major tunnel, whereparticularly low H I columns are found to distances beyond 200 pc; and aparticularly low number of faint objects in the direction of the fourthquadrant of the Galaxy, where nearby intervening H I columns areappreciable. Of particular interest is the composition of the 166detections not previously reported in any EUV catalog. We offerpreliminary identifications for 105 of these sources. By far the mostnumerous (81) of the identifications are late-type stars (F, G, K, M),while 18 are other stellar types, only five are white dwarfs (WDs), andnone are extragalactic. The paucity of WDs and extragalactic objects maybe explained by a strong horizon effect wherein interstellar absorptionstrongly limits the effective new-source search volume and, thereby,selectively favors low-luminosity nearby sources over more luminous butdistant objects.

A spectroscopic search for high azimuthal-order pulsation in broad-lined late F- and early G-stars.
During 3 consecutive nights, 13 southern F- and G-type dwarfs and giantsoutside the conventional δ Scuti instability strip were observedat high spectral (3km/s) and medium temporal (10-15min) resolution. Thestars were selected for their reported broad spectral lines(vsini>=40km/s) so that pulsation in higher azimuthal-order nonradialharmonics could, via the rotational Doppler effect, reveal itself byline profile variability. Two stars turned out to have very narrowlines, one was confirmed as a short-period double-lined binary. Lineprofile ondulations typical of pulsation with azimuthal order8<=m<=14 were detected in δ Aql and ɛ2Ara. In addition, ɛ2 Ara displayed line profiledistortions at a larger scale as they would result from a mode with m~4.The observational sampling of all three variabilities constrainspossible periods only poorly. However, if the variations are periodic,they may well be too slow for p-mode oscillations. This would suggest arelation to the new class of γ Dor variables in which g-modes seemto be excited. If so, the two stars could be the first γ Dor starswith detected higher nonradial-harmonic pulsation. While uvby photometryplaces δ Aql still just within the δ Scuti strip,ɛ2 Ara would be the reddest candidate γ Dorstar to date. For the remaining 8 stars, upper amplitude limits between2 and 6km/s were derived for nonradial mode orders 6<=m<=16 andp-modes with periods ~20minutes. In 3 stars narrow absorption lines weredetected which probably are due to a cool companion.

The Second Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer Source Catalog
We present the second catalog of extreme-ultraviolet objects detected bythe Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The data include (1) all-sky surveydetections from the initial 6 month scanner-survey phase, (2) additionalscanner detections made subsequently during specially programmedobservations designed to fill in low-exposure sky areas of the initialsurvey, (3) sources detected with deep-survey-telescope observationsalong the ecliptic, (4) objects detected by the scanner telescopesduring targeted spectroscopy observations, and ( 3) other observations.We adopt an innovative source detection method that separates the usuallikelihood function into two parts: an intensity diagnostic and aprofile diagnostic. These diagnostics allow each candidate detection tobe tested separately for both signal-to-noise ratio and conformance withthe known instrumental point-spread function. We discuss the dependenceof the false-alarm rate and the survey's completeness on the survey'ssensitivity threshold. We provide three lists of the EUV sourcesdetected: the all-sky survey detections, the deep-survey detections, andsources detected during other phases of the mission. Each list givespositions and intensities in each wave band. The total number of objectslisted is 734. For approximately 65% of these we also provide plausibleoptical, UV, radio, and/or X-ray identifications.

The ROSAT Wide Field Camera all-sky survey of extreme-ultraviolet sources - II. The 2RE Source Catalogue
During 1990-1991 the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the ROSAT satelliteperformed the first all-sky survey at EUV wavelengths. The survey wasconducted in two `colours' using broad-band filters to define wavebandscovering the ranges 60-140 A and 112-200 A. It was fully imaging, witheffective spatial resolution of about 3 arcmin FWHM, and point sourcelocation accuracy of typically better than 1 arcmin. From an initialanalysis, Pounds et al. published the WFC Bright Source Catalogue (BSC)of 383 sources. In this paper we report results from reprocessing of thecomplete survey database; the resulting list of sources is the `2RE'Catalogue. It contains 479 sources, of which 387 are detected in bothsurvey wavebands, a significant advance on the BSC (80 per cent versus60 per cent). Improvements over the original BSC include: (i) betterrejection of poor aspect periods, and smaller random errors in theaspect reconstruction; (ii) improved background screening; (iii)improved methods for source detection; (iv) inclusion of atime-variability test for each source; (v) more extensive investigationof the survey sensitivity. We define the catalogue selection criteria,and present the catalogue contents in terms of tables and sky maps. Wealso discuss the sky coverage, source number-flux relations, opticalidentifications and source variability.

Ca II H and K Filter Photometry on the UVBY System. II. The Catalog of Observations
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1995AJ....109.2828T&db_key=AST

Vitesses radiales. Catalogue WEB: Wilson Evans Batten. Subtittle: Radial velocities: The Wilson-Evans-Batten catalogue.
We give a common version of the two catalogues of Mean Radial Velocitiesby Wilson (1963) and Evans (1978) to which we have added the catalogueof spectroscopic binary systems (Batten et al. 1989). For each star,when possible, we give: 1) an acronym to enter SIMBAD (Set ofIdentifications Measurements and Bibliography for Astronomical Data) ofthe CDS (Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg). 2) the numberHIC of the HIPPARCOS catalogue (Turon 1992). 3) the CCDM number(Catalogue des Composantes des etoiles Doubles et Multiples) byDommanget & Nys (1994). For the cluster stars, a precise study hasbeen done, on the identificator numbers. Numerous remarks point out theproblems we have had to deal with.

SANTIAGO 91, a right ascension catalogue of 3387 stars (equinox J2000).
The positions in right ascension of 3387 stars belonging to the Santiago67 Catalogue, observed with the Repsold Meridian Circle at Cerro Calan,National Astronomical Observatory, during the period 1989 to 1994, aregiven. The average mean square error of a position, for the wholeCatalogue, is +/-0.009 s. The mean epoch of the catalogue is 1991.84.

ROSAT Extreme Ultraviolet / EUV Luminosity Functions of Nearby Late Type Stars
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1994MNRAS.267..840H&db_key=AST

The first Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer source catalog
The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) has conducted an all-sky surveyto locate and identify point sources of emission in four extremeultraviolet wavelength bands centered at approximately 100, 200, 400,and 600 A. A companion deep survey of a strip along half the eclipticplane was simultaneously conducted. In this catalog we report thesources found in these surveys using rigorously defined criteriauniformly applied to the data set. These are the first surveys to bemade in the three longer wavelength bands, and a substantial number ofsources were detected in these bands. We present a number of statisticaldiagnostics of the surveys, including their source counts, theirsensitivites, and their positional error distributions. We provide aseparate list of those sources reported in the EUVE Bright Source Listwhich did not meet our criteria for inclusion in our primary list. Wealso provide improved count rate and position estimates for a majorityof these sources based on the improved methodology used in this paper.In total, this catalog lists a total of 410 point sources, of which 372have plausible optical ultraviolet, or X-ray identifications, which arealso listed.

Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Bright Source List
Initial results from the analysis of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer(EUVE) all-sky survey (58-740 A) and deep survey (67-364 A) arepresented through the EUVE Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL contains356 confirmed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) point sources with supportinginformation, including positions, observed EUV count rates, and theidentification of possible optical counterparts. One-hundred twenty-sixsources have been detected longward of 200 A.

An optical Atlas of ROSAT Wide Field Camera EUV sources
The ROSAT Wide Field Camera has been detecting EUV sources since itslaunch in June 1990. A preliminary list of 384 bright sources has beensupplied by the Wide Field Camera team to the EUVE Guest ObserverCenter, and to the astronomical community. We have extracted 5.4 x 5.4arcmin images of all 384 WFC sources from the Space Telescope ScienceInstitute digitized sky archives. These images are presented asmosaicked finder charts for observers trying either to identify WFCsources or to characterize known sources.

The Kinematics of Active Late Type Stars Observed by the ROSAT Wide-Field Camera
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1993MNRAS.264..106J&db_key=AST

The ROSAT Wide Field Camera all-sky survey of extreme-ultraviolet sources. I - The Bright Source Catalogue
First comprehensive results from an initial processing of the ROSAT WideField Camera all-sky survey for cosmic sources of extreme-ultravioletradiation are presented. The reduction of the survey data has yielded acatalog of 383 relatively bright EUV sources, forming the WFC BrightSource Catalogue. Details of the EUV source positions and count ratesare given, as are optical identifications where known. It is found thatthe log N-log S distributions are unusually flat for the white dwarfstars, but almost Euclidean for the nearby main-sequence late-typestars. The sky distribution of identified white dwarfs is highlynonuniform, suggesting gross variations in the opacity of theinterstellar medium within about 100 pc.

A narrow-band search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) using the interstellar contact channel hypothesis
A search is reported for narrow spectral line emission from 176 targets(including 166 stars and seven globular clusers) at the hypothesized'interstellar communications channel' frequency of 4.462336275 GHz (= pitimes the neutral hydrogen line at 1.42 GHz) using the Parkes Radiotelescope. The frequency was Doppler corrected for the solar barycenter,target barycenter, and cosmic microwave background (CMB) referenceframes. If a 'Galactic club' of extraterrestrial civilizations exists,then the null results, down to a 3 sigma limit of 2 Jy (6 Jy in CMBframe), set an upper limit of 10 exp 8 yr on the lifetime of suchcivilizations.

theta2 Sgr, not an Am Star
Not Available

Catalogue of Variable or Suspected Stars Nearby the Sun
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1990A&AS...85..971P&db_key=AST

BVRI photometry of the Gliese Catalogue stars
Photoelectri BVRI photometry on the Cousins (Kron-Cape) system has beenobtained for many of the southern faint stars in the Gliese Catalog(1969). This extends the work of Cousins (1980) and provides a uniformset of data for the nearby stars. Several red dwarfs are noted, whichwere used to define the red end of the Cousins system.

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Observation and Astrometry data

Constellation:Schütze
Right ascension:20h00m20.30s
Declination:-33°42'14.0"
Apparent magnitude:5.66
Distance:20.877 parsecs
Proper motion RA:130.7
Proper motion Dec:-289.5
B-T magnitude:6.222
V-T magnitude:5.704

Catalogs and designations:
Proper Names   (Edit)
HD 1989HD 189245
TYCHO-2 2000TYC 7444-1240-1
USNO-A2.0USNO-A2 0525-41879560
BSC 1991HR 7631
HIPHIP 98470

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